Benedictine Oblate: November 2012 Archives

Day's Funeral procession.jpgToday is the 32nd anniversary of death of the Servant of God Dorothy Day. The Benedictine Oblate from Brooklyn Heights, NY, who is remembered for her conversion to Christ and His Church and with Peter Maurin founded The Catholic Worker Movement.

In recent days we've learned that the bishops of the USA are standing behind Day's cause for canonization advancing it to the next canonical stage. While the process may be protracted for some, it is a good and substantial process to ascertain the claim of sanctity of the person in question. As an editorial, I tend to think 30 years is a good amount of time between the death of a person and the study process commencing; in my humble opinion I think it was far too short of time for Mother Teresa and Pope John Paul II beatifications; both are saints in my opinion, but I think the process can't be shortchanged because of cosmic popularity.

Day was a Benedictine Oblate of St Procopius Abbey.

The Archdiocese of New York is in charge of the cause of canonization. You can contact the office at 212-371-1000, ext. 2474.
Dorothy Day3.jpgThere are some among the Christian faithful who would prefer not to spend resources, personal and financial, on the sainthood investigation of the Servant of God Dorothy Day. As we know the US bishops have recently given their approval for the process to move forward. The for Day's cause for canonization is being promoted by the Archdiocese of New York; Cardinal Timothy Dolan is a very strong supporter, as is Cardinal Francis George among others.  

For what it is worth, I am in favor of Dorothy Day's cause advancing because I think she faithfully points out in concrete ways that living the Gospel of Jesus Christ is possible, reasonable, even for sinners like me. That is, she reminds us, the living, that the Church is a hospital for the sick (that is, for sinners), and not a museum of the self-righteous. Spare me the people who think they have the Christian path to salvation all figured out. PLUS, Dorothy Day is a Benedictine Oblate [of Saint Procopius Abbey] and that is a terrific witness of the laity taking the spiritual life seriously and humanely. Day's sainthood makes no difference to her; it does make a difference to me; men and women declared saints by the Church --infallible statements of faith-- aren't sainted for their own benefit but those who are a part of the living Church today.

Many have heard it said that Dorothy Day said, "Don't call me a saint. I don't want to be dismissed that easily." But did she, and what did she mean?
Today is the day on which the Oblates of St Benedict of St Meinrad Archabbey renew their oblation at Mass. It is not a public gesture but it is one of significance because it keeps in front of us our offering to God through our attention to the Scriptures, Tradition and the Rule of Benedict.

Today is also the day that the Pope has asked the Church to support in friendship and with finances the contemplative life. Please consider making an offering of prayer and money to a local monastery. They need our prayer and financial support.

The text of the renewal of Oblate promises is noted here.

Mary, mother of Benedictines, pray for us.
Saints Benedict and Scholastica, pray for us.
Saint Henry, pray for us.
Saint Frances of Rome, pray for us.
Day Time mag.jpgThe canonization process of the Servant of God Dorothy Day (1897-1980) the US Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) by an unanimous voice vote on November 13, 2012 at the annual meeting of the bishops.

Sanctorum Mater (2007), requires of the diocesan bishop promoting a sainthood cause to consult at least with the regional bishops' conference on the work of the cause. 

Regarding Dorothy Day, she is a very well-known figure who is often connected with her stances on the economics and politics; the Catholic Worker movement that she co-founded is seen as a socialist and not too Catholic today. Day was based in New York City and her cause of canonization is being promoted by Timothy Cardinal Dolan, archbishop of New York and current president of the USCCB.
Dorothy Day half-length portrait, seated at de...
The Servant of God Dorothy Day's cause for canonization may move forward (or not) depending on how the vote goes. The bishops of USA are meeting this week in Baltimore for the annual business meeting.

Dorothy Day is a Benedictine Oblate of Saint Procopius Abbey. She holds the ecclesial title of Servant of God which denotes that the Nihil Obstat (which says that the Vatican is open to the cause moving ahead).

Cardinal Dolan recently said that Day was a woman of the Church --the one, holy, catholic and apostolic Roman Church; she loved her faith. She had a reasonable view of the Church's ministry, even her sinfulness and yet she held firmly to the intimate connection between the Jesus Christ and the Church.

The anniversary of the Servant of God Dorothy Day's anniversary of death is forthcoming on November 29 (1980).

Listen to what Cardinal Dolan said about Dorothy Day is here.
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About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]



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About this Archive

This page is a archive of entries in the Benedictine Oblate category from November 2012.

Benedictine Oblate: July 2012 is the previous archive.

Benedictine Oblate: March 2013 is the next archive.

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