Tag Archives: St Joseph

Saint Joseph, our model


St Joseph & Infant JA Escalante.jpgToday is a Solemnity in the Church with the feast of Saint Joseph, Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary.
 
The Church prays:
 
Grant, we pray, almighty God, that by Saint Joseph’s intercession your Church may constantly watch over the unfolding of the mysteries of human salvation, whose beginnings you entrusted to his faithful care.
 
A magnificent prayer to pay attention to during lectio.
 
“Today is the day to celebrate fatherhood. To be a father is not an easy challenge – there are many difficulties that go with it. We can look to St. Joseph, who quietly – as I would say, one of the ‘silent fathers’ – handled whatever needed to be handled…it is important [that fathers] pray for discernment, to pray for patience, to pray for these qualities, which can make one a good father.”
 
Fr. Moses Hamungole
Head of Vatican Radio’s
English for Africa service
 
Several people and organizations to pray for today: my father, Edward Joseph, Pope Benedict XVI (Joseph), Brother Joseph at Portsmouth Abbey, the Cistercian abbey of Saint Joseph (Spencer, MA), the Archdiocese of Hartford (the Cathedral of Saint Joseph), the Dominican Province of Saint Joseph, and several other friends named Joseph. Let’s not also forget the Universal Church is under St Joseph, whose patronage she is.

In Saint Joseph we look to the future with confidence & courage, total trust in God’s mercy, Pope says

St Joseph & Jesus.jpgIn the Season of Advent there are so many people to emulate: Jesus, Mary, the martyrs, various other saints, and Joseph in particular. Saint Joseph factors into Catholicism so much that one can reasonably ask, Can any good Catholic not pay attention to Saint Joseph? Obviously not. I took as my oblation name with the Benedictine oblates “Meinrad-Joseph” primarily because of the virtues of Saint Meinrad and for the devotion shown by Joseph for Jesus; in taking the name Meinrad-Joseph I honor my father, Edward Joseph.

The Pope spoke on Sunday at the Angelus on the great foster father of Jesus and the patron saint against doubt, cabinetmakers, Canada, carpenters, China, confectioners, craftsmen, dying people, engineers, families, fathers, happy death, holy death, house hunters, Korea, laborers, Mexico, New France, people in doubt, Peru, pioneers, protector of the Church, social justice, travelers, Universal Church, Vatican II, Viet Nam, workers, working people. AND now the Pope adds pastors to this list under Saint Joseph’s care.

At Sunday’s Angelus Pope Benedict XVI had this to say about Saint Joseph:

On this fourth Sunday of Advent the Gospel of St. Matthew tells us how the birth of Jesus came about, taking the perspective of St. Joseph. He was the betrothed of Mary, who, “before they lived together, was found to be with child by the power of the Holy Spirit” (Matthew 1:18). The Son of God, realizing an ancient prophecy (cf. Isaiah 7:14), became man in the womb of a virgin, and such a mystery simultaneously manifests the love, wisdom and power of God on behalf of humanity wounded by sin. St. Joseph is presented as a “just man” (Matthew 1:19), faithful to God’s law, ready to do his will. On account of this he enters into the mystery of the Incarnation after an angel of the Lord appears to him in a dream and tells him: “Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary your wife with you. In fact the child that has been conceived in her comes from the Holy Spirit; she will give birth to a son and you will call him Jesus: he in fact will save his people from their sins” (Matthew 1:20-21). Forgetting the thought of repudiating Mary in secret, he takes her in because his eyes now see the work of God in her.

St. Ambrose comments that “in Joseph there was amiability and the figure of a just man to make the quality of his witness more worthy” (Exp. Ev. sec. Lucam II, 5: CCL 14,32-33). “He,” Ambrose continues, “could not have contaminated the temple of the Holy Spirit, the Mother of the Lord, the fruitful womb of the mystery” (ibid. II, 6: CCL 14, 33). Although he had been concerned, Joseph “did as the angel of the Lord ordered him,” certain of doing the right thing. Also giving the name “Jesus” to that child who rules the entire universe, he enters into the ranks of the faithful and humble servants, like the angels and prophets, like the martyrs and the apostles — in the words of ancient eastern hymns. St. Joseph proclaims the wonders of the Lord, witnessing Mary’s virginity, the gratuitous deed of God, and caring for the earthly life of the Messiah. So, we venerate the legal father of Jesus (Code of Canon Law, 532), because the new man takes form in him, who looks to the future with confidence and courage, does not follow his own project, but entrusts himself totally to the infinite mercy of him who fulfills the prophecies and inaugurates the season of salvation.

Dear friends, to St. Joseph, universal patron of the Church, I would like to entrust all pastors, exhorting them to offer “to faithful Christians and the whole world the humble and daily proposal of the words of Christ” (Letter Proclaiming the Year for Priests). May our life be evermore conformed to the person of Jesus, precisely because “the one who is himself the Word takes on a body, he comes from God as a man and draws the whole of man’s being to himself, bearing it into the Word of God” (Jesus of Nazareth, San Francisco, 2008, 334). Let us invoke the Virgin Mary with confidence, the one who is full of grace, “adorned by God,” so that at Christmas, which is already near, our eyes may open and see Jesus, and the heart rejoice in this wondrous encounter of love.

Saint Joseph the Worker

Holy Family at Table JMosaert.jpgGod, creator of the world, placed man upon the earth to till it and to keep it, alleluia.

O God, the creator of all things, Who imposed on man the law of work; grant in Thy goodness that, by the example of Saint Joseph and under his patronage, we may accomplish the work that Thou commands us to do and attain the reward  that Thou has promised us.
Saint Joseph, patron of workers, pray for us.

To you, O blessed Joseph (Ad te, beate Ioseph)

Thumbnail image for San Jose El Greco.jpgTo you, O Blessed Joseph, we have recourse in our affliction, and having implored the help of your most holy Spouse, we seek with confidence thy patronage also. By that affection wherewith you were united to the Immaculate Virgin, Mother of God; by the fatherly love with which you did embrace the Child Jesus, we humbly beseech you to look down with gracious eye upon that inheritance which Jesus Christ purchased for us by His Blood, and to help us in our need by your powerful intercession.


Defend, O you most watchful guardian of the Holy Family, the chosen offspring of Jesus Christ. Keep from us, O most loving father, all blight of error and corruption. Aid us from on high, O you our most valiant defender, in this conflict with the powers of darkness. And even as of old you did rescue the Child Jesus from the peril of His life, so now defend God’s Holy Church from the snares of the enemy and from all adversity. Shield us ever under thy patronage, so that imitating thy example and strengthened by your help, we may live a holy life, die a happy death, and attain to everlasting bliss in heaven. Amen.

A partial indulgence is granted to the faithful who invoke Saint Joseph, spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary, with a duly approved prayer (e.g., Ad te, beate Ioseph).

Saint Joseph, Spouse of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Confessor

St Joseph.jpg

Joseph, arising from sleep, did as the Angel of the Lord commanded him and took unto him his wife.

We beseech Thee, O Lord, that we may be helped by the merits of the Spouse of Thy most holy  Mother, so that what we cannot obtain of ourselves may be given to us through his intercession.

Consider reading last year’s post on Saint Joseph.

About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
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