Tag Archives: Pope Benedict XVI

Pope Benedict’s homily for new cardinals: being Catholic embraces the whole universe, bear witness to Christ


As the world knows, the Holy Father created 6 new cardinals. These 6 new Princes of the Church represent the diversity of the “one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church.” Their presence in the College of Cardinals reflect Incarnation of Jesus Christ in the life of the local Church, and at the heart of the Church, Rome. They now begin a new dimension of ecclesial service, a new way of being a disciple of Christ, and they offer their full humanity to making Christ known and loved. The Pope’s homily is below.

I believe in one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church.

These words, which the new Cardinals are soon to
proclaim in the course of their solemn profession of faith, come from the
Niceno-Constantinopolitan creed, the synthesis of the Church’s faith that each
of us receives at baptism. Only by professing and preserving this rule of truth
intact can we be authentic disciples of the Lord. In this Consistory, I would
like to reflect in particular on the meaning of the word “catholic”,
a word which indicates an essential feature of the Church and her mission. Much
could be said on this subject and various different approaches could be
adopted: today I shall limit myself to one or two thoughts.

Rai at concistoro2.jpg

Read more ...

The Infancy Narratives by Joseph Ratzinger

Ratzinger Infancy Narratives.jpgThe third and final volume of Joseph Ratzinger’s bestselling idea on Jesus of Nazareth was generally released today. In the USA it will be released on December 4. The Infancy Narrative (Random House, 2012) is available on Amazon with real good pre-order discount. 

The four chapter plus epilogue book (256 pages) will be first available in 9 languages with another 20 translations planned. According to the press release The Infancy Narratives analyze the gospel narratives from the Annunciation of John and the Nativity of the Lord up to age 12.

The trilogy is deemed as an exceptional trilogy of Benedict XVI.

New cardinals are coming

Cardinal Electors November 2012.jpg

The six bishops being created cardinals of the Holy
Roman Church this coming Saturday are: US Archbishop James M. Harvey, 63,
prefect of the papal household; Lebanon’s Maronite Patriarch Bechara Rai, 72;
Indian Archbishop Baselios Cleemis Thottunkal, 53, head of the Syro-Malankara
Catholic Church; Nigerian Archbishop John Olorunfemi Onaiyekan of Abuja, 68;
Colombian Archbishop Ruben Salazar Gomez of Bogota, 70; and Philippine
Archbishop Luis Tagle of Manila, 55. As signs of the new vocation the new cardinals
will receive from the Pope the red cardinal’s hat and a ring. By custom they
are referred as Your Eminence and in print they are often called “Princes of
the Church.”

Read more ...

Work to regain the light of faith lost, or weakened, Pope preaches



Old Woman Reding Bible GDou.jpg

The Pope’s homily at the close of the Synod of Bishops on the New Evangelization.

The miracle of
the healing of blind Bartimaeus comes at a significant point in the structure
of Saint Mark’s Gospel. It is situated at the end of the section on the
“journey to Jerusalem”, that is, Jesus’ last pilgrimage to the Holy City, for
the Passover, in which he knows that his passion, death and resurrection await
him. In order to ascend to Jerusalem from the Jordan valley, Jesus passes
through Jericho, and the meeting with Bartimaeus occurs as he leaves the city –
in the evangelist’s words, “as he was leaving Jericho with his disciples and a
great multitude” (10:46). This is the multitude that soon afterwards would
acclaim Jesus as Messiah on his entry into Jerusalem. Sitting and begging by
the side of the road was Bartimaeus, whose name means “son of Timaeus”, as the
evangelist tells us. The whole of Mark’s Gospel is a journey of faith, which
develops gradually under Jesus’ tutelage. The disciples are the first actors on
this journey of discovery, but there are also other characters who play an
important role, and Bartimaeus is one of them. His is the last miraculous
healing that Jesus performs before his passion, and it is no accident that it
should be that of a blind person, someone whose eyes have lost the light. We
know from other texts too that the state of blindness has great significance in
the Gospels. It represents man who needs God’s light, the light of faith, if he
is to know reality truly and to walk the path of life. It is essential to
acknowledge one’s blindness, one’s need for this light, otherwise one could
remain blind for ever (cf. Jn 9:39-41).

Read more ...

New cardinals named by Pope Benedict

James M. Harvey.JPG

In a surprise given to the Church this morning, Pope Benedict announced his intention to name new cardinals in November. One of them is an American, Archbishop James Michael Harvey of Milwaukee who has been serving at the Apostolic Household as its Prefect for the last several years. These new cardinals lifts the numbers eligible to vote in a conclave to 122.

In announcing
the intention to create new cardinals, the Pope said: “The Cardinals have
the task of helping the Successor of Peter in the performance of his ministry
of confirming the brethren in the faith, and that of being the principle and
foundation of unity and communion of the Church … fulfill their ministry in the
service of the Holy See or as fathers and pastors of particular Churches in
various parts of the world.”

The proposed list of new cardinals are 

  1. Archbishop James
    Michael Harvey, 63, Prefect of the Pontifical House, who is also appointed
    Archpriest of the Basilica of Saint Paul outside the Walls,
  2. His Beatitude Béchara
    Boutros Raï, 72, Patriarch of Antioch of the Maronites (Lebanon),
  3. His Beatitude
    Baselios Cleemis Thottunkal, 53, Major Archbishop of Trivandrum of the Syro-
    Malankara (India),
  4. Archbishop John Olorunfemi Onaiyekan, 68, Archbishop of Abuja
    (Nigeria),
  5. Archbishop Ruben Salazar Gómez, 70, Archbishop of Bogota (Colombia),
  6. Archbishop Luis Antonio Tagle, 55, Archbishop of Manila (Philippines).

The
consistory will take place on November 24.

About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
coat of arms

Categories

Archives

Humanities Blog Directory