Tag Archives: Pope Benedict XVI

New cardinals are coming

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The six bishops being created cardinals of the Holy
Roman Church this coming Saturday are: US Archbishop James M. Harvey, 63,
prefect of the papal household; Lebanon’s Maronite Patriarch Bechara Rai, 72;
Indian Archbishop Baselios Cleemis Thottunkal, 53, head of the Syro-Malankara
Catholic Church; Nigerian Archbishop John Olorunfemi Onaiyekan of Abuja, 68;
Colombian Archbishop Ruben Salazar Gomez of Bogota, 70; and Philippine
Archbishop Luis Tagle of Manila, 55. As signs of the new vocation the new cardinals
will receive from the Pope the red cardinal’s hat and a ring. By custom they
are referred as Your Eminence and in print they are often called “Princes of
the Church.”

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Work to regain the light of faith lost, or weakened, Pope preaches

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The Pope’s homily at the close of the Synod of Bishops on the New Evangelization.

The miracle of
the healing of blind Bartimaeus comes at a significant point in the structure
of Saint Mark’s Gospel. It is situated at the end of the section on the
“journey to Jerusalem”, that is, Jesus’ last pilgrimage to the Holy City, for
the Passover, in which he knows that his passion, death and resurrection await
him. In order to ascend to Jerusalem from the Jordan valley, Jesus passes
through Jericho, and the meeting with Bartimaeus occurs as he leaves the city –
in the evangelist’s words, “as he was leaving Jericho with his disciples and a
great multitude” (10:46). This is the multitude that soon afterwards would
acclaim Jesus as Messiah on his entry into Jerusalem. Sitting and begging by
the side of the road was Bartimaeus, whose name means “son of Timaeus”, as the
evangelist tells us. The whole of Mark’s Gospel is a journey of faith, which
develops gradually under Jesus’ tutelage. The disciples are the first actors on
this journey of discovery, but there are also other characters who play an
important role, and Bartimaeus is one of them. His is the last miraculous
healing that Jesus performs before his passion, and it is no accident that it
should be that of a blind person, someone whose eyes have lost the light. We
know from other texts too that the state of blindness has great significance in
the Gospels. It represents man who needs God’s light, the light of faith, if he
is to know reality truly and to walk the path of life. It is essential to
acknowledge one’s blindness, one’s need for this light, otherwise one could
remain blind for ever (cf. Jn 9:39-41).

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New cardinals named by Pope Benedict

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In a surprise given to the Church this morning, Pope Benedict announced his intention to name new cardinals in November. One of them is an American, Archbishop James Michael Harvey of Milwaukee who has been serving at the Apostolic Household as its Prefect for the last several years. These new cardinals lifts the numbers eligible to vote in a conclave to 122.

In announcing
the intention to create new cardinals, the Pope said: “The Cardinals have
the task of helping the Successor of Peter in the performance of his ministry
of confirming the brethren in the faith, and that of being the principle and
foundation of unity and communion of the Church … fulfill their ministry in the
service of the Holy See or as fathers and pastors of particular Churches in
various parts of the world.”

The proposed list of new cardinals are 

  1. Archbishop James
    Michael Harvey, 63, Prefect of the Pontifical House, who is also appointed
    Archpriest of the Basilica of Saint Paul outside the Walls,
  2. His Beatitude Béchara
    Boutros Raï, 72, Patriarch of Antioch of the Maronites (Lebanon),
  3. His Beatitude
    Baselios Cleemis Thottunkal, 53, Major Archbishop of Trivandrum of the Syro-
    Malankara (India),
  4. Archbishop John Olorunfemi Onaiyekan, 68, Archbishop of Abuja
  5. Archbishop Ruben Salazar Gómez, 70, Archbishop of Bogota (Colombia),
  6. Archbishop Luis Antonio Tagle, 55, Archbishop of Manila (Philippines).

consistory will take place on November 24.

Philosophy and theology are important in the Church’s dialogue with the contemporary world

Brian Daley Ratzinger Award Alan Holdren CNA.jpgThe Ratzinger Prize is getting a whole currency these days: it is the second year that’s been bestowed on worthy scholars. What’s novel of me is that it’s not everyday that you get a prize for serious work from the man the prize is named after, and that he’s the Supreme Pontiff! The 2012 Ratzinger Prize was given to a French philosopher and American theologian on Saturday, October 20, 2012. Pope Benedict said that “Father Daley and Professor Brague are exemplary for the transmission of knowledge that unites science and wisdom, scientific rigor and passion for man, so that man might discover the [true] ‘art of living.'” Chris Altieri has the Vatican Radio report here.

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Year of Faith: sharing Christ’s Good News is new life, a journey that transforms

In the presence of  hundreds of bishops, the Eastern Catholic Patriarchs, ecumenical partners and laity, Pope Benedict prayed the Mass and preached on the meaning of both the Second Vatican Council and the Year of Faith through the lens of conversion. Benedict is clear: the Year of Faith is not celebrating the 50th anniversary of the Second Vatican Council. The Church needs not a special forum for this anniversary; it is all an invitation to conversion and to deepen one’s faith in the Christ. The homily Pope Benedict delivered today follows.

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fifty years from the opening of the Second Vatican Ecumenical Council, we begin
with great joy the Year of Faith. I am delighted to greet all of you,
particularly His Holiness Bartholomaois I, Patriarch of Constantinople, and His
Grace Rowan Williams, Archbishop of Canterbury. A special greeting goes to the
Patriarchs and Major Archbishops of the Eastern Catholic Churches, and to the
Presidents of the Bishops’ Conferences. In order to evoke the Council, which
some present had the grace to experience for themselves – and I greet them with
particular affection – this celebration has been enriched by several special
signs: the opening procession, intended to recall the memorable one of the
Council Fathers when they entered this Basilica; the enthronement of a copy of
the Book of the Gospels used at the Council; the consignment of the seven final
Messages of the Council, and of the Catechism of the Catholic Church, which I
will do before the final blessing. These signs help us not only to remember,
they also offer us the possibility of going beyond commemorating. They invite
us to enter more deeply into the spiritual movement which characterized Vatican
II, to make it ours and to develop it according to its true meaning. And its
true meaning was and remains faith in Christ, the apostolic faith, animated by
the inner desire to communicate Christ to individuals and all people, in the
Church’s pilgrimage along the pathways of history.

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About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
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