Tag Archives: Opus Dei

Saint Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer

St Josemaría Escrivá de Balaguer.jpg“True shepherds, after my own heart,

I’ll give you,” says the Lord, “Who’ll feed your souls on knowledge and
Sound teaching of my word.”
Thus did Josemaria live, That all might know Christ’s light, Within the holy work of God, And work for Him in might.
O Father, Son, and Spirit blest, Eternal Three-in-One, Your church this hymn of joy will raise, From dawn to set of sun.
The Church liturgically commemorates a significant 20th century priest and founder of a movement of laity and priests, Saint Josemaría Escrivá (1902-75). Saint Josemaría’s call to holiness and friendship with the Lord ought to be an example for all people. His movement, Opus Dei, teaches us that holiness is possible through our everyday life: our work, study, family and friendships. 
J. Michael Thompson 
Copyright © 2010, World Library Publications CM MORNING SONG, McKee

Joseph Muzquiz, priest: possible saint

Joseph Muzquiz.jpgThe Archdiocese of Boston announced on June 2 that it is taking to the next step in overseeing the study of the cause of canonization of Father Joseph Muzquiz (1912-1983).

In the summer of 2010 the initial steps with the Archdiocese and the Congregation for Saints took place. Now, the key task of this process is to see if, in fact, Father Joseph Muzquiz lived a life of heroic virtue.

Father Muzquiz, a priest of the Prelature of the Opus Dei, worked with two others in bringing Opus Dei to the USA. Saint Josemaría had admitted Joseph to Opus Dei in 1941 and had him ordained a priest in 1944 and sent him to the USA in 1949.

With the opening of the sainthood cause, Father Joseph is now referred to the Servant of God Father Joseph Muzquiz. Father Byran K. Parrish presided over the June 2nd ceremony in the name of Sean Cardinal O’Malley and the Most Reverend Emilio S. Allue, the episcopal delegate for the inquiry participated as well as the postulator of the cause, Father David Cavanagh of Opus Dei. About 150 people participated in this ceremony.

Muzquiz canonization  process.jpg

John F. Coverdale authored Putting Down Roots: Fr. Joseph Muzquiz and the Growth of Opus Dei (Scepter Publishers), the narrative of Muzquiz meeting Saint Josemaría and the story of early days of Opus Dei in the US. A brief piece on Putting Down Roots can be read here.
The prayer of petition for Muzquiz’s canonization
God, you helped your servant Joseph work with generosity and simplicity. He spread the message of sanctity in secular life to many people, teaching them to find joy and peace in their daily life. Help me to seek first the kingdom of God by sanctifying my everyday work and dedicating myself generously to the salvation of souls. Glorify your servant Joseph and through his intercession, grant me the favor I ask of you.
 
Our Father. Hail Mary. Glory be to the Father.

‘There Be Dragons’ — Even Saints Have A Past

There Be Dragons.jpg

There’s a film worth watching and spending time thinking about. I believe that we need to reflect upon the great themes of humanity: peace, forgiveness, love, selfishness, self-giving, regret, power, sin, and grace. Either we confront and reject nihilism and thrive, or we capitulate to it and die. We have this opportunity in Roland Joffe’s newest film, “There Be Dragons.”
Comparison’s are not always helpful. The old saying is that comparisons are odious. For many reviewers the only to make sense of “There Be Dragons” is to contrast it with “The Da Vinci Code,” and I happen to see no point in doing so. The two films are apples and oranges, if you will. Be that as it may, “There Be Dragons” is a movie on the early life of a Spanish saint, Josemaria Escrivá de Balaguer (1902-75) which mixes fact with some fiction. The historical context of the film is the Spanish Civil War with all its bloody violence, incredible strident anti-clericalism and whole scale diminishment of the human person.

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Who is Saint Josemaría Escrivá?

St Josemaría Escrivá.jpgThe Pope advocated knowing the lives of the saints as a way of coming to know Christ, and to know how to live one’s baptism. This video of Saint Josemaría Escrivá gives an excellent introduction to the life of a 20th century saint and founder of the lay movement of Opus Dei.

Saint Josemaría’s work was to make known that sanctification is open to all people. People can find God in their ordinary lives; deep spirituality can be found in the everyday activity, at work, in the family, the world. Secularity (not to be confused with secularism) showed the face of the living God. Living for God is what we are all called to, with absolutely no distinction. Holiness is not just for priests and nuns. At his canonization on October 6, 2002, Pope John Paul II called Escrivá the “saint of ordinary life.”
Saint Josemaría’s liturgical memorial is June 26.

Cause for sainthood opened for priest in Boston: Joseph Muzquiz

Joseph Muzquiz2.jpgThe Archdiocese of Boston and Opus Dei have begun in earnest the study of the cause of saint of Father Joseph Muzquiz. Muzquiz labored in the Boston area for many years and died there in 1981. These first steps are being taken to do a proper investigation in possibility of presenting a cause for sainthood to the Church.

Here’s the story in The Pilot.

About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
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