Tag Archives: healthcare

Saint Gianna Berretta Molla: wife and doctor with a passion for life

St Gianna Molla.jpg

Holy Spirit,
Source of every perfection, give us wisdom, intelligence, and courage so that,
following the example of Saint Gianna and through her intercession, we may know
how to place ourselves at the service of each person we meet in our personal,
family and professional lives, and thus grow in love and holiness. Amen.

As Saint Gianna said, “Every
vocation is a call to motherhood or fatherhood, earthly, spiritual or moral.
God has placed in us an instinct for life. A priest is a father, nuns are
mothers, mothers of souls.”

Read the Holy See’s biography of Saint Gianna Berretta Molla

On this feast of Saint Gianna we look for
heavenly assistance with the certain hope that our prayers will be answered.
Our prayerful request of Saint Gianna is for her to ask the Lord for abundant
graces to carry on the great work of Catholic Healthcare in New York and beyond
at The Gianna Center –The Catholic
Healthcare Center Women
. It’s Pro-life, Pro-woman, Pro-Marriage,
Pro-family and Pro-God!!!!

Catholic doctors oppose pending healthcare reform bill

In contrast to the various dissenting sisters’ statement in support of the 153 page HR 3590, the group representing American Catholic physicians spoke against the US Congress proposal to reform of healthcare in the United States. Read what is proposed in this bill.
The doctors who belong to the Catholic Medical Association (CMA) say that HR 3590 is “substantially flawed and [a] unacceptable piece of legislation” because it provides various ways to fund abortion, it introduces new ways to restrict the freedom of conscience clause as it is applied by healthcare workers and the bill is financially problematic, to say the least. Please don’t confuse this organization with the Catholic Health Association which holds opinions contrary to the Church.
Furthermore, the CMA also contends that the Obama administration’s healthcare reform bill will take away from healthcare providers the ability to make sound decisions on a patient’s healthcare. And insult to the American taxpayer, the HR 3590 gives healthcare to illegal immigrants without weighing the cost that would be sustainable and reasonable for the average worker. Healthcare expenses will rise!!!!
What are Catholics for? The bishops have wanted healthcare reform for decades, especially healthcare that assists the common good, that is accessible, affordable, and that has respect for life at every stage of life. Catholics want conscience protection and no funding of abortions. Catholics want the Hyde Amendment to  remain in place. In this case it’s not about the legal status of abortion –because all reasonable people would say that abortion should be reduced– but the point is to not have the taxpayer fund abortions; an abortion is not healthcare, it is killing a person. 
Catholics ought to properly form their consciences with genuine information (from informed news sources) and make voices heard. Catholics make up 20% of voting America!!!
The US Bishops’ analysis of the healthcare bill states:
1. there is an appropriation of $7 billion for community health services that can be used for  elective abortions;
2. there are federal funds to subsidize health programs that cover abortions which can expand in time;
3. the bill has the power to over-ride taxpayers’ desires not to fund abortions. 
Read Archbishop Charles Chaput’s insight/leadership in the healthcare reform debate.

Some nuns are against bishops in support of Obama’s healthcare bill

Yesterday, Network: A National Catholic Social Justice Lobby, released a letter in support of Obama’s bill (HR 3590) to overhaul US healthcare. Obama proposal and the bill put forward is morally flawed.

The signatories claim that they represent 59,000 –an overstated number– religious sisters while they join the Catholic Health Association which has 1200 healthcare related organizations and the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) directly oppose the Catholic teaching. The letter advocating the passing of the healthcare bill is being delivered to each member of Congress today. The text of the letter can be read here.
The Council of major Superiors of Women Religious rejects the position of the Leadership Conference of Women Religious (LCWR) and all other groups who stand against the Church and her bishops.
This is not about mere differing views on a hot topic. It is about faith AND reason, doing justice in an effort to safeguard the dignity of each person, from conception to natural death. No healthcare bill can be supported with provisions for abortion or any other medical procedure that offends life. We have a right to good healthcare but not at the expense of the unborn and morally unsound principles. This is a matter concerning the well-being of those who are vulnerable, poor and everyone else because they have a right to life and a right healthcare. What the Church wants most of all is a healthcare bill that protects life, dignity and freedom of conscience of each person with an ethically sound judgment on healthcare.
The letter the sisters are giving today to Congress is an act of disobedience toward the leadership of the US Bishops and against solid, verifiable Catholic teaching. The sisters neither represent the Church nor are they charged with the salvation of souls as ordained bishops are and therefore are purposely misleading the faithful and any other person of good will. Do not be fooled into thinking that the congregations of sisters think with the Church for the good of salvation. These religious orders of sisters have set themselves against communion with the Catholic Church and against the US bishops position for a comprehensive, wholistic healthcare package that is affordable.
The US Catholic Conference statement on the healthcare bill under consideration
Family Life & Respect Life Office of the Archdiocese of New York has a good plan of action.

Sickness & suffering can become a school of hope, Pope says on the 18th World Day of the Sick

On the 18th World Day of the Sick observed each year on the feast of Our Lady of Lourdes the Pope Benedict sends to the world a message. The Pope draws my attention, and perhaps yours, to the fact that Jesus tells us to do what He has done: be an instrument of healing by allowing divine grace to actually work. To “go and do likewise” is the reason why priests reconcile sinners, strengthen the sick through the sacrament of the sick, to “go and do likewise” is why Sr Mary Ellen Genova visits the sick weekly bring the Gospel and the Eucharist to those who can’t come to church, to “go and do likewise” is why Fr Jordan Kelly and the NY Dominican Friars have a healthcare ministry at 4 of the world’s prestigious hospitals, to “go and do likewise” is doing what Jesus did when we had the anointing of the sick for breast cancer survivors on the feast of Saint Agatha on February 5th, and to “go and do likewise” is why Fr Thomas Berg and the Westchester Institute works on healthcare ethics. There is no end to what we do in order to follow Christ more closely, focusing not on ourselves but on God the Father asking for the grace to deal directly with illness and suffering in a graced-filled manner.

 I extracted three paragraphs from the 2010 message for our consideration here today. The points emphasized are what I think the crucial elements of the papal message to be used for prayer and consideration.

At the end of the parable, Jesus said: “Go and do likewise” (Lk 10: 37). With these words he is also addressing us. Jesus exhorts us to bend over the physical and mental wounds of so many of our brothers and sisters whom we meet on the highways of the world. He helps us to understand that with God’s grace, accepted and lived out in our daily life, the experience of sickness and suffering can become a school of hope. In truth, as I said in the Encyclical Spe salvi, “It is not by sidestepping or fleeing from suffering that we are healed,
but rather by our capacity for accepting it, maturing through it and finding meaning through union with Christ, who suffered with infinite love”
(n. 37).

The Second Ecumenical Vatican Council had already recalled the Church’s important task of caring for human suffering. In the Dogmatic Constitution Lumen gentium we read that “Christ was sent by the Father “to bring good news to the poor… to heal the contrite of heart’ (Lk 4: 18), “to seek and to save what was lost’ (Lk 19: 10)…. Similarly, the Church encompasses with her love all those who are afflicted by human misery and she recognizes in those who are poor and who suffer, the image of her poor and suffering Founder. She does all in her power to relieve their need and in them she strives to serve Christ” (n. 8). The ecclesial community’s humanitarian and spiritual
action for the sick and the suffering has been expressed down the centuries in many forms and health-care structures, also of an institutional character. I would like here to recall those directly managed by the dioceses and those born from the generosity of various religious Institutes. It is a precious “patrimony” that corresponds with the fact that “love… needs to be organized if it is to be an ordered service to the community” (Encyclical Deus caritas est, n. 20). The creation of the Pontifical Council for Health-Care Workers 25 years ago complies with the Church’s solicitude for the world of health care. And I am anxious to add that at this moment in history and culture we are feeling even more acutely the need for an attentive and far-reaching ecclesial presence beside the sick, as well as a presence in society that can effectively pass on the Gospel values that safeguard human life in all its phases, from its conception to its natural end.

bp anointing the sick.jpg

In this Year for Priests, my thoughts turn in particular to you, dear priests, “ministers of the sick”, signs and instruments of Christ’s compassion who must reach out to every person marked by suffering. I ask you, dear presbyters, to spare no effort in giving them care and comfort. Time spent beside those who are put to the test may bear fruits of grace for all the other dimensions of pastoral care. Lastly I address you, dear sick people and I ask you to pray and to offer your suffering up for priests, so that they may continue to be faithful to their vocation and that their ministry may be rich in spiritual fruits for the benefit of the whole Church.

Our Lady of Lourdes, pray for us.

Saint Richard Pampuri, pray for us.

Gianna –The Catholic Healthcare Center for Women

My eyes were opened the other day at the Natural Family Planning seminar for clergy we had at Saint Joseph Seminary especially with the introduction of a new center for women’s health in midtown Manhattan. The Gianna Center is an incredible development –even a gift of the Holy Spirit– for the Church not only in New York, the Tri-State area but indeed for the entire United States. In fact, the brand new center is due to be launched on November 23, 2009 two blocks from Grand Central Station.

Gianna Healthcare for Women logo.jpg

Looking at the Gianna Center you will find a wholistic (comprehensive) approach to women’s healthcare. Their approach in working with issues of reproduction is to intensely pay attention to a woman’s cycle to correct problems without suppressing or destroying the ability to naturally conceive a child. The medical approach here is to work for high effectiveness that respects the dignity of person, adhering to Christ and the Church, and giving a healthy alternative to IVF (which is against all these things).
Gianna will provide a full spectrum of obstetrics and family practice medicine. It will also be a center for medical ethics that is faithful to the Magisterium of the Catholic Church. Likewise, it will teach the methods of Natural Family Planning and NaProTechnology.
The Gianna Center is the convergence in medicine of faith and reason. It brings together the heart of the Incarnation of Jesus Christ today: God loves us so much that He wants us to be in relationship with Him through His Son in the Holy Spirit living in happiness. In speaking of the heart I am not indicating the subjective feelings of the person that may be as variable as there are people in the world. But what I am suggesting here is that the heart is the locus of our affection for reality as it is presented to us and not as what we want it to be. Another words, we need to deal with the God-given reality that we have in front of us, it is the condition of our happiness desired for us by God. Dealing with reality in this way is the same way we have to deal with the size of the foot we have at the end of our leg: we can’t alter its size because it is given. The reality in this case is the cooperating with God in bringing human life into this world as God has intended it to happen.
Hence, putting (keeping?) faith and reason together was the work of Pope John Paul II and it is the current work of Pope Benedict XVI. It is the daily work of the members of groups like Communion & Liberation and Opus Dei aiming as Luigi Giussani said in the Religious Sense, toward “the sense of responsibility toward destiny.” AND in my opinion the work of the Gianna Center brings together faith and reason because it has the affection for human reality as it is presented to the world because it is God-given.

Gianna founders.jpg

The Gianna Center is the brainchild of Joan Nolan and Dr. Anne Mielnik. Of course, no project worthy of mention is done in a vacuum. It’s ably assisted by Dr. Kyle Beiter, Jamey Johnston and Jena McFadden and co-funded by Saint Vincent’s Hospital and the John Paul II Center.
Contact information
15 East 40th Street, Suite 101
New York, NY 10016 USA

About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
coat of arms



Humanities Blog Directory