Tag Archives: Dorothy Day

Dorothy Day’s new biography

The Servant of God Dorothy Day has a new critical biography penned by accomplished biographers John Loughery and Blythe Randolph. According to the NYTimes review of the book, the authors viewed their subject as “challenging and complex.” Dorothy Day: Dissenting Voice of the American Century is a portrait of Day but it is incorrect to claim that it is the first in 40 years. There are a few other biographies of Dorothy Day published in recent years. I look forward to delving into the Loughery and Randolph volume; my hope is that they did not merely perpetuate the same old cliches. But I doubt it. Already in the review one gets the sense that Day is treated more as a political person than someone who encountered Jesus Christ and desired to live in creative tension and toward the Gospel and the Tradition of the Catholic Church. Terms used to describe Day without due attention to her relationship with Christ and the Mystical Body of Christ are misleading. Happy reading.

The review can be read here.

Dorothy Day’s anniversary of death

 

 

On this day in 1980, Dorothy Day went home to Our Lord. Pray for her canonization.

Servant of God Dorothy Day, pray for us.

Saint’s granddaughter writes: Dorothy Day in a new perspective

kate hennessyKate Hennessy has written about her grandmother, the Servant of God Dorothy Day in a new memoir, Dorothy Day: The World Will Be Saved by Beauty: An Intimate Portrait of My Grandmother.

A look at Kate Hennessy’s book can be read here. You can also listen to the interview in the aforementioned link.

From the article:

From the Is Day a saint then in the final analysis?

“It’s complicated,” Hennessy says. “She is foremost my grandmother, that’s the most important relationship for me. The process for canonization is very much a church process and the church needs to do what it needs to do and I hope it’s not going to become bogged down in proceduralism or conflict.” Hennessy said.

Then she quickly adds, “I absolutely believe she’s a saint, aside from the canonization. Just the way she leads us to change our perception of ourselves and the world around us, I think is so full of grace.”

Me, too. I hope that the sainthood study process does not stall. May the Lord be blessed with Dorothy’s beatification!

Dorothy Day’s teaching on Justice

dorothy-day“If you find the life of Dorothy Day inspiring, if you want to understand what gave her direction and courage and strength to persevere, her deep attentiveness to others, consider her spiritual and sacramental life.”

These are the words of Jim Forest published in an article, “What I learned about justice from Dorothy Day,” that originally appeared in the July/August 1995 issue of Salt of the Earth magazine. This article is really good and I highly recommend it. One reason being you really do locate the source of Day’s thinking and spirituality in the Eucharistic Heart of Our Savior, Jesus.  Is there really anything more to be taught/learned by way of praying before the Blessed Sacrament?

Jim Forest began his association with Dorothy Day in 1961, when he moved to New York City to join the Catholic Worker community there. Jim is the author of an excellent introduction on the life and work of Dorothy Day called All Is Grace.

Dorothy Day’s caused for sainthood has been introduced. It would be good to learn from Day on how to be an authentic Catholic and not some secularist: Go to Jesus through the example of Dorothy!

St Teresa –thirsting for God

Mother Teresa & Dorothy Day, New York 1979 (Photo by Bill Barrett)I saw this picture of Servant of God Dorothy Day and Saint Teresa and wondered what they talked about. Did they pray? I wondered what the visit meant to each of them, and what was the lasting impact the meeting had for them and their co-workers. Saints meet saints and encourage others to be saints.

The other day Cardinal Pietro Parolin concluded a homily by remembering the two simple words of the newly canonized Saint Teresa of Calcutta posted in every house of the Missionaries of Charity: ‘I thirst’.

‘I thirst,’ the cardinal said, ‘a thirst for fresh, clean water, a thirst for souls to console and to redeem from their ugliness to make them beautiful and pleasing in the eyes of God, a thirst for God, for His vital and luminous presence. I thirst; this is the thirst which burned in Mother Teresa: her cross and exaltation, her torment and her glory.’

Both Dorothy Day and Saint Teresa give witness to thirsting for God.

Saint Teresa of Calcutta, pray for us!

About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
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