Tag Archives: Dominicans

The NEW Blackfriars Films … Come, my Way, my Truth, my Life

Blackfriars filmsThe New York Province of Dominicans have brought together several media initiatives and created for themselves a new media division under the sponsorship of the Province of Saint Joseph with the debut of Blackfriar Films. They are off and running…

Here we have a treat with Father Austin Dominic Litke, OP, Father Robert Koopman, OSB and Leah Sedlacek performing a new arrangement of the beautiful 17th century hymn, “Come, My Way, My Truth, My Life.” The beautiful scenery of New York City is the God-given canvas for preaching Gospel and sharing the Christian faith with the world.

Father Austin is a campus minister at NYC and Father Robert is a monk of Saint John’s Abbey (MN) where he’s a music educator and artist.

In case you want to meditate on the beautiful words Father Austin is singing, here they are:

Come, my Way, my Truth, my Life:
such a way as gives us breath,
such a truth as ends all strife,
such a life as killeth death.

Come, my Light, my Feast, my Strength:
such a light as shows a feast,
such a feast as mends in length,
such a strength as makes his guest.

Come, my Joy, my Love, my Heart:
such a joy as none can move,
such a love as none can part,
such a heart as joys in love.

Third Order Dominicans, New Haven, celebrate rites of reception and profession

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Pope Benedict XV (1914-1922), himself a Third Order Dominican, said,
“Among the means of holiness most useful and opportune for the defense of and progress of Christian faith and morals in our day, we recognize the Dominican Third Order as one of the most eminent, easy, and secure.”
This afternoon New Haven’s Lay Fraternity of Saint Dominic (the Dominican Third Order Laity) celebrated the rites of reception for two new members, simple profession of five and the final profession of two in the context of Sunday Mass. The president of the chapter Linda Kelly and the religious assistant, Father Jordan Schmidt, OP, (who stands in the place of the Master of the Order) received the promises. The rites were held at Saint Mary’s Church in New Haven, CT.
The promises made a more intense living of one’s baptismal vows but now the person promises actually live in a fuller way as the Apostles did in relationship to the Divine Master. Though we rarely think of the graces of Baptism with any regularity, here the profession of promises by the laity accentuate the reality of grace first received when we were first washed of Original Sin and made members of the Mystical Body of Christ. 

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One of the exhortations made by the priest singled out the the manner of life out to be seen as being salt of the earth and light of the world for the purpose of honoring God and the salvation of souls. Hence, what is at the center of the promises are the gifts of the Holy Spirit. Those making the promises are asked if they are “resolved to be more closely bound to Christ and the service of the Church,” “to walk in the newness of life” adhering to what Saint Dominic proposed in terms of announcing the Good News and following the Lord,” and that according to their particular state in life as laity, they have a share in the Church’s “apostolic mission by prayer, study and preaching.” Therefore, they have a new bond with the Order of Preachers.
Blessings to Fraternity of Saint Dominic of New Haven, especially to our friends Tacy and Steve. May what God has given us be brought to completion.
Saint Dominic, pray for us.
Saint Catherine of Siena, pray for us.
All saints and blessed of the Dominican Order, pray for us.

Last year’s post on these same rites.

Irish Dominicans cling to tradition, are renewed

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The link this article, “For Friars, Finding Renewal by Sticking to Tradition,” leads you to a story about the Irish Dominicans who have had a resurgence in vocations by a keen attention to their tradition and the Church’s. While the author concentrates on the wearing of the habit, there are other things that have been recovered: an authentic companionship (communal life), faithfulness to the Church, the wearing of the habit and the common, evangelical mission and conversion of mind and heart. Kudos for the Irish OPs in recognizing the signs so as not to diminish further, or even die.

I can’t help but think that George Weigel’s latest book, Evangelical Catholicism, reflects what the future of the Church will be, including life in religious orders, not only in the USA, but around the world. You have to read, and re-read this book. Plus, I am tending to think that Cardinal Dolan was correct in saying that the Church in the USA is more concerned with the institution than she is with being missionary. Would that it be the case that the Benedictines could recognize what the Irish OPs did. I offer this article so that we all may share in the Irish OPs joy for their own renewal. We can benefit by their witness.

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Popes who belonged to religious orders

Pope Gregory XVI made gambling on papal electi...

Pope Gregory XVI, a Benedictine monk, made gambling on papal elections punishable by excommunication.

When Jorge Mario Bergoglio was elected the 266th Roman Pontiff he was listed among a rather small and elite group of men who had their intellectual and spiritual formation in religious life. Bergoglio is a member of the Society of Jesus. But who are the others?

The Benedictine monks have 17
Gregory I, Boniface IV, Adeodatus II, Leo IV, John IX, Leo VII, Stephen IX, Gregory VII, Victor, III, Urban II, Paschal II, Gelasius, II, Celestine V, Clement VI, Urban V, Pius VII, Gregory XVI
The Augustine canons and friars have 6
Honorius II, Innocent II, Lucius II, Adrian IV, Gregory VIII, Eugene IV
The Franciscans friars have 4
Nicholas IV, Sixtus IV, Sixtus V, Clement XIV
Secular Franciscans have 2
Pius IX, Leo XIII
The Dominicans friars have 4
Innocent V, Benedict XI, Pius V, Benedict XIII
The Cistercian monks have 2
Eugene III, Benedict XII
The Theatine clerks regular have 
Paul IV
The Jesuit clerks regular have 1
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St Dominic’s Monastery: A Life of Faithfulness

Linden-courtyard.jpgSome time ago I mentioned here on Communio the monastery in Linden, Virginia which getting a jim-start on living the monastic life according to the Dominican charism. St Dominic’s Monastery is an exceptional place

Why is St Dominic’s a place to support? There are many reasons, not the least is the fact the nuns are very serious about the monastic life demonstrated by their observance of communal liturgical and personal prayer, their sacrifice of time and generous giving of self, the witness of the full habit, and commitment to the ideals of Saint Dominic and his successors. The nuns follow the path charted by Christ and the saints.

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About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
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