Tag Archives: culture

The Snow Miser strikes…again

Snow Miser

More snow! When will it end?

Watching it snow is beautiful for a time, but with the cold it’s tough to adjust.

New voting machines

new voting machines

You have a new option in voting… one booth on the left and another on the right. Your pick.

@ started with the Benedictine monks

@The theory of how the image ‘@’ came into being is passing through cyberspace, again, these days. We all know that monks of all types, Benedictines, Cistercians, Augustinians, etc., had much to do with culture. This is particularly true, I believe with the Benedictine and Cistercian monks who worked out tools for writing but also useful things for art, cooking, gardening and beer making to name just a few ideas. What was helpful and labor-saving in the monastery had applications for the rest of the world.

Here is a 2009 story on @ found at Wired.

Just the other day the Huffington Post published this note about the ubiquitous @.

The point is not raise your awareness about the history of the @. It is to help you recall that things don’t fall out of the sky on to your plate, or your computer screen. A real person has had to dream and work out the tool used.

Our intellectual and religious history needs to be recalled and honored.┬áMuch of the world that uses email has to use ‘@’ to send a message. Next time you do, pray for the Benedictines.

Cooling a dog

cooling the dog.jpg

Somehow I think the dog has a good deal going for himself. Happy Summer!

Why the face?

BRF.jpgBitchy Resting Face (BRF) is a syndrome that portrays a sour expression. Thoughtfully sad and silently suffering people, typically women. (There is a male version which I will leave alone for now.) Do you find it hard to match the others joyous attitude in an honest way? Are you smiling?

Societal expectations say that you SHOULD smile all the time. Do you need surgery or just give the person suffering from BRF a break? Here’s the parody.
On a serious note, there are many are pop-psychologists and take every opportunity to diagnose what you are thinking and feeling based on a perceived BRF.

About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
coat of arms

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