Tag Archives: culture

Lincoln, a drama


ALincoln.jpgA new drama about the life of Abraham Lincoln and the role that his fourteen years in Spencer County, Indiana, played is being planned for the bicentennial of his birth in 2009.

 

LINCOLN premieres June 12, 2009

 

 

The Catholic Newt

According to Matt Bai’s article “Newt. Again.” in the March 1st NYTimes Magazine, Newt Gingrich, 65, is coming into full communion with the Catholic Church, or at least that is what he reported. The author made a simple parenthetical statement that Newt was entering his wife’s faith. Thanks be to God.

Religious film posters exhibit chronicled in NYC


Solome.jpg
None can sense more deeply than you artists, ingenious creators of beauty that you are, something of the pathos with which God at the dawn of creation looked upon the work of his hands. A glimmer of that feeling has shone so often in your eyes when–like the artists of every age–captivated by the hidden power of sounds and words, colours and shapes, you have admired the work of your inspiration, sensing in it some echo of the mystery of creation with which God, the sole creator of all things, has wished in some way to associate you” (John Paul II, Letter to Artists, 1). With this in mind, I think of the various ways the arts of engaged my sense of beauty, how good art has expressed my relationship with God and how impoverished (even oppressive) life would be without the work of artists.

 

Honestly, I rarely think with any degree of seriousness on how religious posters have demonstrated the genius of human creativity much less how this medium has impacted the our sense of living in tension with the Divine. But I believe this is what we have here. The exhibit, “Reel Religion: A Century of the Bible and Film” gives us a strong indication of this impact and what has transpired since the 19th century.

 

The posters belong are a part of Dominican Father Michael Morris‘ (and look here) collection. Morris is a professor of art and religion at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California .

Besides posters there are other memorabilia such as Charlton Heston’s tunic and cape from the 1959 award-winning Ben-Hur and correspondence from directors.

The “Reel Religion” exhibit opened February 6th and will close on May 17th.

 

See a video clip on the subject. 

 

The Museum of Biblical Art (MOBIA) brings to the public an interpretation of art through the lens of biblical religions and an understanding of religion through its artistic manifestations.”

 

A version of this exhibit was seen at St. Louis University’s MOCRA last year.

Archbishop Demetrios Chair in Orthodox Theology and Culture, at Fordham Univ


Abp Demetrios.jpgThe President of Fordham University, Fr. Joseph M. McShane, S.J. announced Tuesday Feb. 17, a Jaharis Family Foundation gift establishing the Archbishop Demetrios Chair in Orthodox Theology and Culture as part of the Orthodox Christian Studies Program of this renowned Roman-Catholic Jesuit University.

 

The announcement came at the conclusion of the Sixth Annual Orthodoxy in America Lecture given this year by Fr. Stanley Harakas, ThD, who is the Archbishop Iakovos Professor of Orthodox Theology Emeritus at Holy Cross Greek Orthodox School of Theology. Fr. Harakas’ topic “The Future of Orthodox Christianity in America: A Normative Approach” captivated his diverse audience of academics, clergymen, students and laymen. He outlined the threats and pitfalls but also the opportunities of the social and cultural reality in America and suggested ways of what we need to do and ought to do, as Orthodox.

 

Following the lecture President McShane announced the establishment of the Archbishop Demetrios Chair in Orthodox Theology and Culture through a generous donation of two million dollars by the Jaharis Family Foundation. Fr. McShane welcomed Michael and Mary Jaharis as he expressed his great joy and gratitude. He further said that naming the chair after Archbishop Demetrios is a most deserving honor and that the University was “thrilled that his name (the Archbishop’s) and the name of the Jaharis family will forever be associated with Fordham.”

 

Pope Benedict meets with Pope Pelosi

The Holy See’s Press Office released a statement this morning about the US Speaker of the House’s visit to the Holy See and to the Pope:

 

Following the General Audience the Holy Father briefly greeted Mrs. Nancy Pelosi, Speaker of the United States House of Representatives, together with her entourage.

 

His Holiness took the opportunity to speak of the requirements of the natural moral law and the Church’s consistent teaching on the dignity of human life from conception to natural death which enjoin all Catholics, and especially legislators, jurists and those responsible for the common good of society, to work in cooperation with all men and women of good will in creating a just system of laws capable of protecting human life at all stages of its development.

 

Pope & Pelosi.jpgGood for the Pope. I wish I could’ve been there watching the Speaker’s face while the Pope teaches her (and her entourage) the orthodox faith including the various constituent components of Catholic moral teaching. I’m sure she knew that the Pope would say something about her heterodoxy but I bet she didn’t expect such a direct address. Or, did she? You know, she’s not very clear on these things so every little bit helps. Perhaps now she’ll actually become a believing Catholic and not one that merely picks and chooses what to believe so as to keep an influential job.

 

Now, can we get Joe Biden and the other Catholics in Congress to meet Pope Benedict?

 

About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
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