Tag Archives: Christ

Christ or Christendom?

There is much consider as the culture many of us live in secularizes, that is, divorces us from a tangible Christian perspective, manner of being, and how we live in a world with diverse opinions. Today, we have to ask about Christ or Christendom. It is said that Saint Augustine asked, what there is of Christian among Christians is Christ.  He is orienting our attention not to an idea but to a person, a meeting, an encounter, with a person. Emphatically we all have to state that to be a Christian is to be in contact with a person, Jesus the Christ. Being Christian does not mean moral norms, cultural ideology, and precepts of the Church. Morality, culture and precepts within an ecclesiology are extraordinarily important, but they are secondary in accepting Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior and adhering to Him; it is also a firm belief in heaven (salvation).

Is Christ important, or are consequences of Christ? We all have to come to terms with how we let what and who we believe in impact the way we live. That is, does Jesus Christ really mean something to you and does said belief  have consequences in the manner of how you live? As a friend of Jesus Christ, what does it mean to hold to an “economy of salvation”? How do we interpret history of the Christian era? What role does true faith play in this period of history? Where are we as Christians in this history? Does eternal life with the Trinity mean anything anymore?  In order to do so we have to be as objective as possible; our ideological impulses have to be put aside so as to deal with reality without rewriting the past.

Start now in developing a more coherent, mature faith in Jesus Christ and then in His Church. You ought to read the following articles to begin (remember not to form conclusions yet) your thinking on the subject:

A Marseille priest who loves his vocation: everything must start afresh from Christ

Michel Marie Zanotti-Sorkine.jpg

Can I say this?
I want every priest to be like Michel-Marie Zanotti-Sorkine: a sign of
unlimited availability to Christ and to humanity.

In Marina Corradi’s Avvenire article “The Pope is
Right: Everything Must Start Afresh from Christ
,” (thanks to Sandro Magister for bringing this article to our consideration) she portrays a French priest
that is attractive and full of humanity. 

Two paragraphs strike me as important
for us to reflect upon: 

  •  “…he
    affirms that a priest who has an empty church must examine himself and say: ‘It
    is we who lack fire.’ He explains: ‘The priest is ‘alter Christus,’ he is
    called to reflect Christ in himself. This does not mean asking perfection of
    ourselves; but being conscious of our sins, of our misery, in order to be able
    to understand and pardon anyone who comes to the confessional.'”

  • “In church, he
    welcomes everyone with joy: ‘Even the prostitutes. I give them communion. What
    should I say? Become honest, before you enter here? Christ came for sinners,
    and I have the anxiety, in withholding a sacrament, that he could bring me to
    account for it one day. But do we still know the power of the sacraments? I
    have the misgiving that we have excessively bureaucratized the admission to
    baptism. I think of the baptism of my Jewish mother, which in terms of the
    request of my grandfather was merely a formal act: and yet, even from this
    baptism there came a priest.'”

His pastoral plan for those who ask the question
about returning to the practice of the faith: “the Marian embrace, and
impassioned apologetics, which touches the heart.”

A man with
Russian-Jewish-Corisican-Italian blood, a singer-song writer, author (his
latest is Au diable la tiédeur, {To the devil with lukewarmness}), and now an
ordained Catholic priest in the Archdiocese of Marseille.

Father Michel-Marie
Zanotti-Sorkine is pastor at Saint-Vincent-de-Paul in Marseille.

Christ is something that is happening to me now –our engagement with Giussani’s At the Origins of the Christian Claim

Fraternity CL Logo.JPGThose who follow the lay ecclesial movement, Communion
and Liberation
, and attend the weekly School of Community, know that we’ve come
to end of our work on Father Luigi Giussani book, the The Religious Sense. For the
coming year we will be working on Giussani’s At the Origin of the Christian
. On January 25, 2012, at the Teatro degli Arcimboldi, Milan, Father Julián
Carrón’s made a presentation of Father Luigi Giussani’s book. 

That presentation
is noted here: 
Christ is something that is happening to me now.pdf

Quoting Don Giussani, 

Et incarnatus est-Father Giussani says-“is singing at its purest,
when all man’s straining melts in the original clarity, the absolute purity of
the gaze that sees and recognizes. Et incarnatus est is contemplation and
entreaty at the same time, a stream of peace and joy welling up from the
heart’s wonder at being placed before the arrival of what it has been waiting
for, the miracle of the fulfillment of its quest. […]

As we approach the 30th anniversary of papal approval of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation on February 11th, let’s call on the intercession of Our Lady of Lourdes and Saint Benedict, co-patrons of the Movement to guide our way to the Word Made Flesh.

Infinity Dwindled to Infancy –reviewed by George Weigel

Infinity -ETO.jpeg

Over the summer Jesuit Father Edward Oakes published his latest book, Infinity Dwindled to Infancy.

I posted a blog piece about the Infancy here.

Father Oakes’ book was reviewed by George Weigel on First Things: read it (actually, read the review and the book).
You can now get the book in paper and on Kindle at Amazon.

Exaltation of the Holy Cross

Exaltation of the Cross Pdella Francesca.jpg

Consummatum est. It is completed — it has come to a full end. The mystery of God’s love toward us is accomplished. The price is paid, and we are redeemed. The Eternal Father determined not to pardon us without a price, in order to show us especial favor. He condescended to make us valuable to Him. What we buy we put a value on. He might have saved us without a price –by the mere fiat of His will. But to show His love for us He took a price, which, if there was to be a price set upon us at all, if there was any ransom at all to be taken for the guilt of our sins, could be nothing short of the death of His Son in our nature. O my God and Father, Thou hast valued us so much as to pay the highest of all possible prices for our sinful souls– and shall we not love and choose Thee above all things as the one necessary and one only good?

Blessed John Henry Newman

Meditation on the 12th Station

About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
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