Tag Archives: Benedictine saints and blesseds

Saint Mechtilde

St Mechtilde2.jpg

 

The Benedictine liturgical calendar and some diocesan calendars observes the memorial of Saint Mechtilde today.

Saint Gregory the Great

Gregory the Great Matthew Aldreman.jpgFor Gregory the Great, a hinge figure between the ancient world — the Senate of Rome last met while Gregory was the city’s bishop — a hinge between the ancient world and the grand experiment called Christendom, for Gregory this awareness that to look upon the face of Christ brought knowledge of God inspired an extensive exploration of Scripture to discern how God would have us live, how the Church and its leaders could best serve those seeking to know Christ Jesus and the Father. Since rightful authority comes from God, Gregory reasoned, its exercise must ever include a pastoral intent.

 

 

Father James Flint, OSB

Saint Procopius Abbey

3 September 2011

 

 

 

 

Let us pray for the Benedictine monks of Portsmouth Abbey, Portsmouth, Rhode Island, on this their abbey’s patronal feast day. May God prosper the work of their hands!

 

You may also be interested in the 2010 blog post that has a hymn to Saint Gregory the Great by J. Michael Thompson. 

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux


St Bernard.jpgI consider that the blessing of a fuller sanctification
descended upon her [Mary, the Mother of God], so as not only to sanctify her birth, but also to keep her
life pure from all sin; which gift is believed to have been bestowed upon none
other born of woman. This singular privilege of sanctity, to lead her life
without any sin, entirely benefited the queen of virgins, who should bear the
Destroyer of sin and death, who should obtain the gift of life and
righteousness for all. 



Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, 1090-1153, Cistercian, Abbot and Doctor
of the Church

Saint Henry: Benedictine Oblate and patron of sovereign leaders

St Henry II crowned by Christ.jpgThe Church recalls the witness of an emperor and a Benedictine Oblate, Saint Henry (972-1024), Duke of Bavaria. Henry was crowned king in Rome by Pope Benedict VIII in 1014. It is said that Henry was assisted by the saints throughout his life but especially at Mass when he was anointed king. He was an insightful leader, lay man who had concern for the discipline of the Church and who had love for the Benedictine monastic life. He was a supporter of Cluny’s reforms. It was through Saint Henry that the King of Hungary and later saint, Stephen, met Christ and was baptized.

Benedictine history tells us that he made a vow to the Abbot of Saint-Vanne in Verdun, thus, the tradition of Henry being an Oblate. (For more of what a Benedictine Oblate is, read this post).
Both he and his wife, Cunegunda were canonized by the Church and revered as saints.

Understanding Saint Benedict

San Benedetto.jpg“St. Benedict’s is best understood as the spirituality
of ordinary life… The Benedictine is a spirituality of work: man’s by labor,
God’s by prayer.” (John Senior)




Saint Benedict (480-543) “If one wishes to
understand in depth his personality and life, he can find in the disposition of
the Rule the exact image of all the actions of the master, because this saintly
man is incapable of teaching other than he lived.” (Saint Gregory)

About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
coat of arms

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