Tag Archives: Benedictine saints and blesseds

Saint Scholastica, the persistent twin sister

OSB nun posing as St Scholastica.jpgAs we celebrate anew the Memorial of the Virgin Saint Scholastica, we pray, O Lord, that, following her example, we may serve you with pure love and happily receive what comes from loving you.

Scholastica according to the tradition of the Church, was the twin sister of Saint Benedict having been born in 480 in Nursia. As twins do, Saint Scholastica followed her sibling. One could say that poor Benedict couldn’t dodge his sister but the love they had for one another was intense and natural that nothing else would suffice. 
The Saint went to Monte Cassino (just south of Rome) known today as the Arch-Coenobium and died there in 547. Scholastica founded a monastery for women following the Rule compiled by her brother.
As the Mass collect above says, let’s follow Scholastica’s example of service of the Lord with a love that is pure and receive what the Lord gives happily.
Let us pray for the intentions of the Benedictine nuns in the USA, particularly nuns of the monasteries of Regina Laudis (Bethlehem, CT), the Glorious Cross (Branford, CT), St Emma (Pittsburgh, PA), St Walburga (Virginia Dale, CO), Immaculate Heart of Mary (Westfield, VT) and Our Lady of Ephesus (Kansas City, MO).
Re-read a post on keeping focus on Christ

Miracles, heroic virtue, new blesseds, new saints, 2 Americans

Sixty-seven people who are being proposed for sainthood had their causes advanced today when Angelo Cardinal Amato, SDB, Prefect of the Congregation for the Causes of Saints presented the respective cases to His Holiness, Pope Benedict XVI.

Several were recognized as martyrs for the Faith; their witness to Christ resulted in their being killed in hatred of the faith (odium fidei). 7 who were identified as living a life of heroic virtue were women who founded religious congregations of sisters.

Others were diocesan and religious priests, nuns, sisters and lay people. The martyrs came from Spain having died in the mid-1930s. Of note to me was…

Maria Luisa Gertrude Prosperi~the recognition of the miracle attributed to the intercession of the Servant of God Maria Luisa (nee Gertrude Prosperi; 1799-1847; image) an Abbess of the Benedictine Abbey in Trevi;

~the recognition of the miracle attributed to the intercession of the Blessed Kateri Tekakwitha (1654-1672), an American lay woman and first Native American;

~the recognition of the miracle attributed to the intercession of the Blessed Marianne Cope (nee Barbara; 1838-1918), a Franciscan sister who worked with Saint Damian of Molokai.

The Filipino community gets its second saint with the acceptance of the miracle attributed to Blessed Pedro Calungsod (1654-1672), a lay catechist.

Saint Mechtilde

St Mechtilde2.jpg

 

The Benedictine liturgical calendar and some diocesan calendars observes the memorial of Saint Mechtilde today.

Saint Gregory the Great

Gregory the Great Matthew Aldreman.jpgFor Gregory the Great, a hinge figure between the ancient world — the Senate of Rome last met while Gregory was the city’s bishop — a hinge between the ancient world and the grand experiment called Christendom, for Gregory this awareness that to look upon the face of Christ brought knowledge of God inspired an extensive exploration of Scripture to discern how God would have us live, how the Church and its leaders could best serve those seeking to know Christ Jesus and the Father. Since rightful authority comes from God, Gregory reasoned, its exercise must ever include a pastoral intent.

 

 

Father James Flint, OSB

Saint Procopius Abbey

3 September 2011

 

 

 

 

Let us pray for the Benedictine monks of Portsmouth Abbey, Portsmouth, Rhode Island, on this their abbey’s patronal feast day. May God prosper the work of their hands!

 

You may also be interested in the 2010 blog post that has a hymn to Saint Gregory the Great by J. Michael Thompson. 

Saint Bernard of Clairvaux


St Bernard.jpgI consider that the blessing of a fuller sanctification
descended upon her [Mary, the Mother of God], so as not only to sanctify her birth, but also to keep her
life pure from all sin; which gift is believed to have been bestowed upon none
other born of woman. This singular privilege of sanctity, to lead her life
without any sin, entirely benefited the queen of virgins, who should bear the
Destroyer of sin and death, who should obtain the gift of life and
righteousness for all. 



Saint Bernard of Clairvaux, 1090-1153, Cistercian, Abbot and Doctor
of the Church

About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
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