Christmas Novena, Third Oration

O Admirable Leader Who gains the obedience of Your
people not by the severity of Your judgment but by the sweetness of Your love
and Your welcome sojourn among us. We beseech You, through Your Pure Nativity
and through the intercession of Your Mother and Saint Joseph, Your Chosen One,
to teach us complete obedience to Your holy commandments and to submit to our
superiors, not for fear of punishment but by a willing surrender of mind and

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Christmas Novena, Second Oration

O Hope of the Patriarchs and longing of the Gentiles,
in Your Nativity You have granted us hope. The joy of this hope has called
together the Shepherds, the Magi and all believers in Your Holy Name, and led
them to adore You with all the acclaim of their hearts. We beseech You, through
Your Pure Nativity and through the intercession of Your Virgin Mother and Saint
Joseph, Your Chosen One, to keep us, by Your grace, from attachment

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The Greater Antiphons (aka ‘O Antiphons’) of Advent

o-antiphons.jpg

Advent slightly shifts its focus beginning tomorrow (December 17) when the antiphons for Vespers known
as the
Greater Antiphons, but more commonly known as the O Antiphons, are sung.

These biblical texts are sung as the verse introducing the
Magnificat song at Vespers. Most people know these Great Antiphons as the hymn
called “O Come, O Come Emmanuel” (Veni, Veni, Emmánuël). Each verse of the hymn is

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THE most significant Advent antiphon

In my opinion, the best antiphon beside the O Antiphons (which begin tomorrow at Vespers), and I am merely echoing the informed opinions of liturgical scholars, is the Rorate caeli (Rain down you heavens) antiphon in the Advent season. It is the expectation of Israel seen through the eyes of the prophet Isaiah (45:8). The whole purpose of the Incarnation is spoken of here:

Drop down dew, ye heavens, from above, and let the clouds rain the Just One.

Be not angry, O Lord, and remember no longer our iniquity:

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About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
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