Category Archives: Sainthood causes

Pope to canonize Jesuit without second miracle

Peter FaberWhen Pope Francis spoke with Jesuit Father Antonio Spadaro of La Civiltà Cattolica he spoke in a definite manner of his admiration for the person and charism of Blessed Peter Faber, a 16th century Jesuit and close collaborator of Saint Ignatius of Loyola. This was likely the first time many heard of Peter Faber.

Blessed Peter was an early companion of Loyola and was the first of the early founders to be ordained a priest. Moreover, it ought to be recalled that Faber was a master in giving the Spiritual Exercises.

It is expected that Pope Francis will canonize Faber (1505-1546) in December. This papal act is clearly more important for the Society of Jesus than for others in the Church unless they have a devotion to the Spiritual Exercises. I welcome this canonization for the same reasons that others speculate that move Pope Francis.

The procedure of canonization is an act of infallibly of the Pope. The decision has been made. He has deemed the canonization will happen without a certified second miracle is not without precedent. Pope Benedict did the equivalent canonization for Hildegard of Bingen while making her a Doctor of the Church at the same time. Pope Francis waived the second miracle for Blessed John XXIII. Other examples are cited in the article below. The papal pen writes many things, even bulls of canonization.

Andrea Tornielli writes,

French Jesuit priest Peter Faber to be made a saint in December

ANDREA TORNIELLI
VATICAN CITY
Pierre Faber, a “Reformed” Jesuit priest whom Francis sees as a model figure, is to be proclaimed as saint before Christmas, Stefania Falasca reports in an article for Italian Catholic newspaper Avvenire. The process for his cause in the Congregation for the Causes of Saints is complete and now all that remains is for Francis to issue the Bull of Canonization that will proclaim the first companion of St. Ignatius a saint, extending the cult of the soon-to-be-saint to the Universal Church.

Faber was born in the Upper Savoy region of France in 1506 and died in Rome in 1547 just a few weeks before he was due to attend the Council of Trent. He was beatified in September 1872 with a Papal Rescript issued by the Sacred Congregation of Rites and ratified by the Society of Jesus. Now Francis is extending the liturgical cult to the Universal Church.

The process followed for Faber’s canonization is called “equivalent canonization”. This is when the Pope omits the judicial process and ceremonies involved and orders a servant of God to be venerated in the Universal Church, when such a saint has been from a remote period the object of veneration, when his heroic virtues (or martyrdom) and miracles are related by reliable historians, and the fame of his miraculous intercession is uninterrupted. “Examples of this in recent history include John Paul II, who decreed 3 such canonizations, Benedict XVI who decreed 1, the last of which was that of Angela da Foligno, confirmed last 9 October by Pope Francis,” Avvenire writes.

But Faber’s canonization takes on a whole new meaning as the Jesuit is “a model of spirituality and priestly life for the current successor of Peter. At the same time, he is an important reference point for understanding the Pope’s leadership style.” Faber lived on the cusp of an era when the unity of the Church was being threatened. He mostly kept out of doctrinal disputes and steered his apostolate towards a reform of the Church, becoming a pioneer of ecumenism.”

Francis spoke about Faber in his famous interview with Jesuit journal Civiltà Cattolica, revealing some key aspects of the priest as a figure: “[His] dialogue with all, even the most remote and even with his opponents; his simple piety, a certain naïveté perhaps, his being available straightaway, his careful interior discernment, the fact that he was a man capable of great and strong decisions but also capable of being so gentle and loving.”

“The picture of Faber that emerges from the texts is that of a thinker in action, a man who was profoundly attracted by the figure of Christ and was understanding of people. The cause of separated siblings was one he held close to his heart and he was good at discerning spirits. He lived an exemplary priestly life and the unconditional nature of his ministry was reflected in his patience and gentleness. He gave himself without asking others for anything in return. Faber distinguished himself for his “affective magisterium”, in other words, his gift for spiritual communication with people and his ability to put himself in other people’s shoes,” Falasca writes

Mother Celestine Bottego moved closer to beatification

Pope Francis accepted the findings of the Congregation of Saints today that Mother Celestine Bottego lived a life of heroic virtue. She is now given the title of Venerable Servant of God. Mother Celestine was founder of the Xaverian Missionary Sisters of Mary, was born on 20 December 1895, in Glendale, Ohio. She lived in Butte, Montana until she was almost 15, when she then moved with her mother to Italy.

Bottego was teaching English at a school of the Xaverian Fathers; One priest, Father Giacomo Spagnolo, asked her to consider forming a women’s branch of the order. Her discernment led her to form the congregation in 1944. She died in Italy in 1980 at the age of 84. A miracle attributed to Mother Celestine’s intercession still is needed before she can be beatified. She would add brilliantly to the constellation of US saints and blesseds.

Cora Evans may be an American saint

Cora EvansThe cause for sainthood has been opened for Cora Evans, a Catholic convert from Mormonism and since March 2012 bears the title of Servant of God. Cora Evans died in 1957. Cora Evans is unknown to most of the Catholics in the USA but is recalled as holy, humble housewife.

The story of Evans’ sainthood study is written by Mark Emmons in San Jose, CA.

The importance of a person like Cora Evans for us today is that she wasn’t a religious or a cleric but “…some who lived an ordinary life, was a good person, and should be imitated by living our lives in a prayerful way,” said her postulator, Father Joseph Grimaldi. Popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI advocated the search for examples among the laity for saintliness. It is said that Evans experienced the mystery of the stigmata.

Venerable Alfred Pampalon: Patron of Alcoholics and Drug Addicts

Recently, a friend, Father Sean, recommended the Venerable Alfred Pampalon is the Patron of Alcoholics and Drug Addicts, on his Facebook page. I am not sure what prompted him to do, but it was a welcomed and helpful piece of information. As you know, there is a Catholic saint and blessed for every need; even those being proposed for sainthood have causes to mind. Today is the anniversary of death of Father Alfred Pampalon.

For me, this is a great “find.” Why? Because for the last year my sister has been possessed by her addiction to alcohol. To date, she’s been brought to the hospital for various reasons: alcohol induced seizures, ulcers, depression and the like. Alcohol is truly an insidious disease. With this so personal experience I am humbled and moved by the fragility of those who carry such a cross as alcoholism and depression. In many ways my sister’s cross is an opening for grace to enter more deeply into my own sinful life. So, I am happy to know of Father Alfred and his patronage. Through his intercession I am hoping for a healing for my sister and my family, but also for others who carry this disease inside them. Alcohol and the related problems are a real cross to bear; Alfred’s was TB as was the residual set of health complications. But it is said that he had a burning desire to help his people know (meet) Jesus and to lighten the burden of those whose cross so very heavy to bear.

Father Alfred Pampalon (24 November 1867 – 30 September 1896), born in French Canada. Father Alfred was a Redemptorist priest who studied in Belgium. Father Alfred is known as a great apostle of the Saint Anne de Beaupré shrine. He died very young at the age of 28 of TB. his cause for canonization was opened and he was recognized has having heroic virtue. Thus he was declared Venerable Servant of God, May 14 1991, by Pope John Paul II.

Dear Father Alfred, listen to my cry and come to my aid. Obtain for me the favors I desire. You are well known as the protector of people who are suffering in body, mind and spirit.

You show special compassion for alcoholics and drug addicts. You have freed so many people from their dependencies. Free NN. (me) also, I beg you, dear Father Alfred, and free those people I recommend to you, especially members of my family.

I come to you with confidence. I pray for myself and for all those who are dear to me. Come also to the assistance of the Church and of the whole world. Amen.

Father Alfred realized clearly that “There is no virtue without prayer.” Here is a novena of prayers.

Dom Antoine Marie, OSB, monk of the French Abbey of Saint-Joseph de Clairval, writes extensive biographies of the saints for his abbey’s newsletter. If you are interested, here is entry for Father Alfred.

Remembering John Paul I

John Paul I

On this day in 1978, the Cardinals elected Cardinal Albino Luciani, 65, as the Pope to follow Pope Paul VI who died on August 6.

Luciani took the name John Paul and died 33 days later. Luciani had been the Patriarch of Venice.

On this day in 2002 the diocesan phase studying the possible cause for canonization was opened. It was closed in 2006 and the Roman phase opened in 2009. A miracle is being proposed for the Pope’s cause.

Eternal Memory.

John Paul I, pray for us.

About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]yahoo.com.
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