Category Archives: Franciscans

Finding the Body of Saint Clare

St Clare of Assisi.jpgThis day a brilliant star rises, for today Saint Clare, the poor handmaid of the Lord, is glorified in heaven.

Lord, we recall the memory of Saint Clare the virgin. Through her merits, and following her example, may we be strengthened in our hope and charity as we await the glorious resurrection and the enjoyment of eternal communion with you.
Let me take the opportunity to promote the Capuchin Poor Clare vocation…something good happening here.

Saint Francis Mary of Camporosso

St Francis Mary of Camporosso.jpgLavishly he gave to the poor; his generosity shall endure forever.

God our Father, you made your lowly servant Saint Francis Mary illustrious through every work of charity. Grant us through his prayers and example always to continue in sincere and humble service of our brothers [and sisters].
Some calendars have Saint Francis Mary’s liturgical memorial on September 19 and others on the 20th.
Know more about Saint Francis Mary
Another version of the saint’s life

CFR Sudan Mission

Fr Herald & Eric.jpeg

Appeals for money on this blog are rare but I believe in giving to needy philanthropic projects. Plus, this request comes via my friend Henry who is connected with the priest in question (and seen to the right).

On my own recommendation I urge you to give because I believe the work and witness of the Franciscans. AND that I am in school with many Franciscan Friars of the Renewal, I am asking for consideration of Father Herald Brock’s mission work. Father Herald is a Franciscan Friar of the Renewal. Therefore, I want to encourage you to consider making a donation.  Details about the situation are on Father Herald’s blog.

Donations in the form of checks or money orders made out to “CFR Sudan Mission,” can be sent to the following address:


CFR Sudan Mission
PO Box 1086
Secaucus, NJ 07096-1086


Please note in the memo box if you would like the funds to be used for hunger relief.

Peace in Christ

Franciscans cultivate possibilities for change for addicts

Some of our brothers and sisters have found themselves in a downward spiral that could end in premature death if a fundamental change doesn’t happen: getting & remaining clean. It’s easy to pontificate about the necessity to get and stay clean “or else,” perhaps even trying brow-beat someone into change hoping to trigger a desire to live more healthily. None this works. The simple thing is to allow God’s grace to work and to have a clean environment to live and work, to provide competent professional help and to make opportunities available for substantive change to happen. One more ingredient in my book that’s essential and a non-negotiable is the spiritual. Prayer, spiritual direction and fidelity to the witness of the Church goes to the root level of human desires and happiness given us by Divine Providence. But we have to admit that unless a drug addict wants to change her life no amount clever argument or cute programing is going to matter. If a person doesn’t take his human heart (his desires) seriously, including his need of happiness, then there is little we who aren’t captured by addiction can do.

The Franciscan Friars and Sisters of the Atonement have opened their friary, St Christopher’s Inn, in Garrison, New York for drug habilitation for the homeless. The Franciscans have developed a culture of life for those who are vulnerable and weak and hoping to live differently.
Last Sunday (August 16) the NY Times ran an article about the work of a farm sponsored by the friars and sisters along with the laity who collaborate to make change possible. The setting is an organic farm where the slow yet determined life of plants provide the metaphor for conversion: ground prepared, seeds planted, soil and plants watered, hoed, weeded and hoping for a harvest.
Please read the article and watch the video clip provided therein.

2010 Week of Prayer for Christian Unity: You are witness of these things

Since 1908 the Church has called upon us to join in prayer with
other Christians around the world during the Week of Prayer for Christian
. We do this work of prayer as an education in hope for spiritual and actual Christian unity realizing that the Holy Spirit is the only one capable of bring unity among various groups of Christians. The proposal for a week of prayer was initiated in the USA by Franciscans of the Atonement Father Paul
Wattson and it is held from January 18 – 25. Today the observance is international in scope.

It is generally held that the 1910
World Mission Conference
in Edinburgh, Scotland, marked the beginnings of the
modern ecumenical movement.

2010 WPCU.jpg

In tribute, the promoters of the Week of Prayer for
Christian Unity, the Commission on Faith and Order and the Pontifical Council for
Promoting Christian Unity
, invited the Scottish churches to prepare this year’s
theme.  They suggested: “You are
witnesses of these things
” (Luke 24:48).

The 2010 theme is a reminder that as the
community of faith those reconciled with God and in Christ, “You are witness of
these things
“–witness to the truth of the power of salvation in Jesus Christ
who will also make real his prayer, 
“That all may be one…so the world may believe.” *Witness gives praise
to the Presence who gives us the gift of life and resurrection; by knowing how
to share the story of our faith with others; by recognizing that God is at work
in our lives; by giving thanks for the faith we have received; by confessing
Christ’s victory over all suffering; by seeking to always be more faithful to
the Word of God; by growing in faith, hope and love; and by offering
hospitality and knowing how to receive it when it is offered to us.

to observe the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity are available from the
Graymoor Ecumenical and Interreligious Institute, a ministry of the Franciscan Friars
of the Atonement

For more information visit

About the author

Paul A. Zalonski is from New Haven, CT. He is a member of the Fraternity of Communion and Liberation, a Catholic ecclesial movement, and an Oblate of Saint Benedict. Contact Paul at paulzalonski[at]
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